"Marking up a letter" assessment


#1

Hi, I just completed the “Marking up a letter” assessment and would appreciate a marking guide/any feedback. Thanks!


<!DOCTYPE html>

<html lang="en-US">
  <head>
    <meta charset="utf-8">
    <meta name="author" content="Eleanor Gaye">
    <title>Letter</title>
    <link rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="style.css">
  </head>
  <body>
    <p class="receiver-column"><strong>Dr. Eleanor Gaye</strong><br/>
    Awesome Science faculty<br/>
    University of Awesome<br/>
    Bobtown, CA 99999,<br/>
    USA<br/>
    <strong>Tel:</strong> 123-456-7890<br/>
    <strong>Email:</strong> no_reply@example.com</p>

    <p class="receiver-column"><time datetime="2016-01-20">20 January 2016</time></p>

    <p><strong>Miss Eileen Dover</strong><br/>
    4321 Cliff Top Edge<br/>
    Dover, CT9 XXX<br/>
    UK</p><br/>


    <h1>Re: Eileen Dover university application</h1>

    <p>Dear Eileen,</p>

    <p>Thank you for your recent application to join us at the University of Awesome's
    science faculty to study as part of your <abbr title="Doctor of Philosophy">PhD
    </abbr> next year. I will answer your questions one by one, in the following sections.</p>


    <h2>Starting dates</h2>

    <p>We are happy to accomodate you starting your study with us at any time, however
      it would suit us better if you could start at the beginning of a semester; the start
      dates for each one are as follows:</p>
    <ul>
      <li>First semester: <time datetime="2016-09-09">9 September 2016</time></li>
      <li>Second semester: <time datetime="2017-01-15">15 January 2017</time></li>
      <li>Third semester: <time datetime="2017-05-02">2 May 2017</time></li>
    </ul>

    <p>Please let me know if this is ok, and if so which start date you would prefer.<br/>

    You can find more information about <a href="http://example.com" target="_blank"
    title="important uni dates">important university dates on our website.</a></p>


    <h2>Subjects of study</h2>

    <p>At the Awesome Science Faculty, we have a pretty open-minded research facility —
      as long as the subjects fall somewhere in the realm of science and technology.
      You seem like an intelligent, dedicated researcher, and just the kind of person we'd
      like to have on our team. Saying that, of the ideas you submitted we were most
      intrigued by are as follows, in order of priority:</p>
    <ol>
      <li>Turning H<sub>2</sub>O into wine, and the health benefits of Resveratrol
        (C<sub>14</sub>H<sub>12</sub>O<sub>3</sub>.)</li>
      <li>Measuring the effect on performance of funk bassplayers at tempratures exceeding
        30<sup>o</sup>C (86<sup>o</sup>F), when the audience size exponentially increases
        (effect of 3 &times; 10<sup>3</sup> &gt; 3 &times; 10<sup>4</sup>.)</li>
      <li><abbr title="HyperText Markup Language">HTML</abbr> and <abbr title="Cascading Style Sheet">
        CSS</abbr> constructs for representing musical scores.</li>
    </ol>

    <p>So please can you provide more information on each of these subjects, including how
    long you'd expect the research to take, required staff and other resources, and anything
    else you think we'd need to know? Thanks.</p>


    <h2>Exotic dance moves</h2>

    <p>Yes, you are right! As part of my post-doctorate work, I <em>did</em> study exotic tribal dances.
      To answer your question, my favourite dances are as follows, with definitions:</p>
    <dl>
      <dt>Polynesian chicken dance</dt>
      <dd>A little known but <em>very</em> influential dance dating back as far as
        300<abbr title="Before Christ">BC</abbr>, a whole village would dance around in
        a circle like chickens, to encourage their livestock or be "fruitful".</dd>
      <dt>Icelandic brownian shuffle</dt>
      <dd>Before the Icelanders developed fire as a means of getting warm, they used
        to practice this dance, which involved huddling close together in a circle on
        the floor, and shuffling their bodies around in imperceptably tiny, very rapid movements.
        One of my fellow students used to say that he thought this dance inspired
        modern styles such as Twerking.</dd>
      <dt>Arctic robot dance</dt>
      <dd>An interesting example of historic misinformation, English explorers in the 1960s
        believed to have discovered a new dance style characterised by "robotic",
        stilted movements, being practiced by inhabitants of Northern Alaska and Canada.
        Later on however it was discovered that they were just moving like this because
        they were really cold.</dd>
    </dl>

    <p>For more of my research, see my <a href="http://example.com" target="_blank"
    title="exotic dance research page">exotic dance research page.</a></p>

    <p>Yours sincerely,<br/><br/><br/><br/>
    Dr. Eleanor Gaye</p>

    <p>University of Awesome motto: <q cite="Bill S Preston, Esq">Be awesome to each other.</q>
    -- <cite>Bill S Preston, <abbr title="Esquire">Esq</abbr></cite></p>

  </body>
</html>

Learning web development: Marking guides and questions
Learning web development: Marking guides and questions
I completed marking up a letter assessment and would appreciate feeback and suggestions
Learning web development: Marking guides and questions
Learning web development: Marking guides and questions
Learning web development: Marking guides and questions
Learning web development: Marking guides and questions
Learning web development: Marking guides and questions
Learning web development: Marking guides and questions
Learning web development: Marking guides and questions
Learning web development: Marking guides and questions
Learning web development: Marking guides and questions
Learning web development: Marking guides and questions
Learning web development: Marking guides and questions
Learning web development: Marking guides and questions
Learning web development: Marking guides and questions
(Chris Mills) #2

Hi there!

Well done — from a glance, your code looks really good. You can find the marking guide and check your code against our version at https://github.com/mdn/learning-area/blob/master/html/introduction-to-html/marking-up-a-letter-finished/marking-guide.md.

Best regards,

Chris Mills
MDN content lead


#3

Awesome, thanks for the link!


(ggy) #4

There is still a problem with your file


#5

Thanks @ggy, I updated the code & it should be good now:

<q cite="Bill%20S%20Preston,%20Esq">


(Adeseyeair3s) #6

Hello All, how is my letter formatting? A bit tedious, but I think I am getting used to this HTML thing and “web semantics” thing ; /

[code]

letter markup

Dr. Eleanor Gaye Awesome Science faculty University of Awesome Bobtown, CA 99999, USA Tel: 123-456-7890 Email: no_reply@example.com
20 January 2016

</p>
        
     <p>
    
    <strong> Eileen Dover </strong>
    4321 Cliff Top Edge
    Dover, CT9 XXX
    UK
     </p>
     <article>
      <header>
         <h1>Re: Eileen Dover university application</h1>
      </header>
         <p>Dear Eileen,
          Thank you for your recent application to join us at the University of Awesome's science faculty to study as part of your 
          <abbr title="Doctor of Philosophy">PhD</abbr> next year. I will answer your questions one by one, in the following sections.
         </p>
         
       <section id="start_Dates">

         <h2> Starting dates</h2>
         <p>
         We are happy to accomodate you starting your study with us at any time, however it would suit us better 
         if you could start at the beginning of a semester; the start dates for each one are as follows:
        </p>
         <ul>
            <li> First semester:<time datetime="2016-09-09"> 9 September 2016</time></li>
             <li> Second semester: <time datetime="2017-01-01"> 15 January 2017 </time></li>
             <li> Third semester: <time datetime="2017-05-02"> 2 May 2017 </time> </li>
        </ul>
        <p>
         Please let me know if this is ok, and if so which start date you would prefer.

        You can find more information about <a href="javascript:void(0)">important university dates</a> on our website.
        </p>
       </section>
       <section>
           <h2> subject of study </h2>
            <p>
               At the Awesome Science Faculty, we have a pretty open-minded research facility — as long as the subjects fall somewhere in the realm of science and technology. 
               You seem like an intelligent, dedicated researcher, and just the kind of person we'd like to have on our team. Saying that, of the ideas you submitted we were most intrigued by are as follows, in order of priority:
            </p>
           <ol>
                <li> Turning H<sub>2</sub>O into wine, and the health benefits of Resveratrol (C<sub>14</sub>H<sub>12</sub>O<sub>3</sub>.)</li>
                <li> Measuring the effect on performance of funk bassplayers at tempratures exceeding 30<sup>o</sup>C (86<sup>o</sup>F), when the audience size exponentially increases (effect of 3 &times; 10<sup>3</sup> > 3 x 10,<sup>4</sup>.)</li>
                <li> <abbr title="HyperText Markup Language">HTML</abbr> and <abbr title="Cascading Style Sheets">CSS</abbr> constructs for representing musical scores.</li>
        
          </ol>
          <p>  So please can you provide more information on each of these subjects, 
              including how long you'd expect the research to take, required staff and other resources,4
               and anything else you think we'd need to know? Thanks.
          </p>
       </section>
            <section>
              <h2>Exotic dance moves</h2>
                  <p>Yes, you are right! As part of my post-doctorate work, 
                      I <em>did</em> study exotic tribal dances. To answer your question, my favourite dances 
                      are as follows, with definitions:
                  </p> 

                <dl>
                    <dt> polynesian chicken dance</dt>
                        <dd>A little known but <em>very</em> influential dance dating back as far as 300<abbr title="Before Christ/Common Era">BC</abbr>,
                             a whole village would dance around in a circle like chickens, to encourage 
                             their livestock or be "fruitful".
                        </dd>
                    <dt>Icelandic brownian shuffle</dt>
                        <dd>Before the Icelanders developed fire as a means of getting warm, 
                            they used to practice this dance, which involved huddling close together in a circle on the 
                            floor, and shuffling their bodies around in imperceptably tiny, very rapid movements. One of my fellow 
                            students used to say that he thought this dance inspired modern styles such as Twerking.
                        </dd>    
                    <dt>Arctic robot dance</dt> 
                         <dd>An interesting example of historic misinformation,
                             English explorers in the 1960s believed to have discovered a new dance style 
                             characterised by "robotic", stilted movements, being practiced by inhabitants of Northern Alaska and Canada. 
                             Later on however it was discovered that they were just moving like this because they were really cold.
                         </dd>
                </dl> 

                <aside>
                    <p>For more of my research, see my <a href="javascript:void(0)"> exotic 
                    dance research page. </a>
                    </p> 
                </aside>     
            </section>

              <div>  Yours sincerely,</div>
     </article>
<footer>
    Dr.Eleanor Gaye <br>
    University of Awesome Motto: <cite> Be excellent to each other" </cite> Bill S Preston, Esq"
</footer>
</body>
[/code]

Cheers!


(Janet Swisher) #7

@chrismills, Can you take a look at @Air3s’s code? (I know it’s been a busy week)


(Meaix88) #8

You got most of it, but here are a few things. You don’t have any <br> tags in your addresses (and a couple of other places) so those are run together on one line. You need to have a break tag at the end of each of those lines like you did at the end. Also, you shouldn’t have used headers, sections, and footers for the different parts. Semantically, those are indicative of different parts of a website. Since this is just a single document, it should just be paragraph and the different list tags. You also cited the quote instead of Bill. you should have quote tags around the quote (and make sure to remove both of the quotation marks because the quote tags will add them in the browser) and cite tags around Bill’s name (you can tell by looking at the final product on the browser that you have the quote in the cite tags because they show as italicized). Be careful about little stuff, too. You changed (or copied incorrectly) little things wrong such as capitalization/spacing errors. The devil is in the details when it comes to coding.


(Chris Mills) #9

Thanks for jumping in here @mealxnorth, great answer! And apologies to @Air3s for not getting back to you quicker!


(Adeseyeair3s) #10

Fixed the address br tags, I must have forgotten those hehe.
and fixed the citing.

So section tags are not used used to denote a separate parts/topics of a composition?


(Meaix88) #11

Air3sAdeseyeair3s
meaixnorth:
. You need to have a break tag at the end of each of those lines like you did at the end. Also, you shouldn’t have used headers, sections, and footers for the different parts. Semantically, those are indicative of different parts of a website. Since this is just a single document, it should just be paragraph and the different list tags. You also cited the quote instead of Bill. you should have quote tags around the quote (and make sure to remove both of the quotation marks because the quote tags will add them in the browser) and cite tags around Bill’s name (you can tell by looking at the final product on the browser that y
Fixed the address br tags, I must have forgotten those hehe.
and fixed the citing.

So section tags are not used used to denote a separate parts/topics of a composition?

It depends on what the composition is. A simple document like this which is essentially an email being posted online, then no you wouldn’t use section, main, aside, header, footer, etc. tags. Once you get to CSS, semantics becomes clear very quickly. It’s one of those things that will all of a sudden click–at least that’s how it was for me.


(Chris Mills) #12

I’d just like to add that on a page that is complex enough to need separate container elements (e.g. a website with a header, footer, multiple columns, etc.), a section element can be used to contain some markup that relates to a particular purpose or function, like:

  • An interactive map.
  • A set of summaries of articles related to the area of the map you’ve just selected, or perhaps a list of details about accommodation in that area.
  • A list of geographic data about that area of the map.

The article element on the other hand is used to contain repeating sets of information in a series that are all related to one another. So for example, each article summary or set of accommodation details in the example above could be wrapped in an article element.

The descriptions of article and section in the HTML spec are rather confusing…also note that it is possible for an article element to contain multiple sections, as well as a section element containing multiple articles.


(Adeseyeair3s) #13

Okay, that I understand. I guess I treated the email as a dedicated webpage.

When it says markup, the wording is sort of open to any kind of interpretation imo.

Thank you for your help!

@chrismills

I agree the wording for article and section are a bit ambiguous, but why cant that letter be represented by an article tag? It is it not independent content?

lastly, for section tag. If what I am wrapping is an independent section unrelated to the main site (like a set of outbound links), it would use a div tag(s). Is the definition suggesting that the section tag only be used to represent (any) section related to the website? (or document)

Bests
-Air3s


(Chris Mills) #14

When it says markup, the wording is sort of open to any kind of interpretation imo.

In many cases, yes — there are often multiple ways to solve a markup problem, some slightly better than others. Usually you can’t go that far wrong (e.g. using a section, div or article for an individual piece of writing on a page would probably be OK; using a button element wouldn’t be!)

I agree the wording for article and section are a bit ambiguous, but why cant that letter be represented by an article tag? It is it not independent content?

It is, yes, and you wouldn’t be wrong if you did wrap it in an article. However, I chose to not bother including a separate wrapper element, as it is the only thing on the page, so doesn’t really need further separation.

lastly, for section tag. If what I am wrapping is an independent section unrelated to the main site (like a set of outbound links), it would use a div tag(s). Is the definition suggesting that the section tag only be used to represent (any) section related to the website? (or document)

I’d say a section would still be fine for such a use. It would be a separate group of functionality on the page. If the links were external but related to the content of the page (e.g. further reading links), then an aside element would be appropriate.


(Kartik Shetti) #15

Hello there,
Finished marking up the letter assignment.
Eager for your feedback or any kind of suggestions on how to improve the markup.
Sorry i could not send the html as an attachment as i am a newbie to the community and not allowed to send an attachment…

Marking uo a letter body { max-width: 800px; margin: 0 auto; }

.receiver-column {
text-align: right;
}

h1 {
font-size: 1.5em;
}

h2 {
font-size: 1.3em;
}

p,ul,ol,dl,address {
font-size: 1.1em;
}

p, li, dd, dt, address {
line-height: 1.5;
}

Dr. Eleanor Gaye
Awesome Science faculty
University of Awesome
Bobtown, CA 99999,
USA
Tel: 123-456-7890
Email: no_reply@example.com

20 January 2016

Miss Eileen Dover
4321 Cliff Top Edge
Dover, CT9 XXX
UK

Re: Eileen Dover university application

Dear Eileen,

Thank you for your recent application to join us at the University of Awesome’s science faculty to study as part of your PhD next year. I will answer your questions one by one, in the following sections.

Starting dates

We are happy to accomodate you starting your study with us at any time, however it would suit us better if you could start at the beginning of a semester; the start dates for each one are as follows:

  • First semester: 9 September 2016
  • Second semester: 15 January 2017
  • Third semester: 2 May 2017

Please let me know if this is ok, and if so which start date you would prefer.

You can find more information about important university dates on our website.

Subjects of study

At the Awesome Science Faculty, we have a pretty open-minded research facility — as long as the subjects fall somewhere in the realm of science and technology. You seem like an intelligent, dedicated researcher, and just the kind of person we'd like to have on our team. Saying that, of the ideas you submitted we were most intrigued by are as follows, in order of priority:

  1. Turning H2O into wine, and the health benefits of Resveratrol (C14H12O3.)
  2. Measuring the effect on performance of funk bassplayers at tempratures exceeding 30°C (86°F), when the audience size exponentially increases (effect of 3 × 103 > 3 × 104.)
  3. HTML and CSS constructs for representing musical scores.

So please can you provide more information on each of these subjects, including how long you'd expect the research to take, required staff and other resources, and anything else you think we'd need to know? Thanks.

Exotic dance moves

Yes, you are right! As part of my post-doctorate work, I did study exotic tribal dances. To answer your question, my favourite dances are as follows, with definitions:

Polynesian chicken dance
A little known but very influential dance dating back as far as 300 BC, a whole village would dance around in a circle like chickens, to encourage their livestock or be "fruitful".
Icelandic brownian shuffle
Before the Icelanders developed fire as a means of getting warm, they used to practice this dance, which involved huddling close together in a circle on the floor, and shuffling their bodies around in imperceptably tiny, very rapid movements. One of my fellow students used to say that he thought this dance inspired modern styles such as Twerking.
Arctic robot dance
An interesting example of historic misinformation, English explorers in the 1960s believed to have discovered a new dance style characterised by "robotic", stilted movements, being practiced by inhabitants of Northern Alaska and Canada. Later on however it was discovered that they were just moving like this because they were really cold.

For more of my research, see my exotic dance research page.

Yours sincerely,

Dr Eleanor Gaye

University of Awesome motto: Be awesome to each other. -- Bill S Preston, Esq


(Javierpolit) #16

Hi, I've just completed the "Marking up letter" assessment and would like someone to send feedback. Thanks

JS Bin

Dr. Eleanor Gaye
Awesome Science faculty
University of Awesome
Bobtown, CA 99999,
USA
Tel: 123-456-7890
Email: no_reply@example.com

20 January 2016


Miss Eileen Dover
4321 Cliff Top Edge
Dover, CT9 XXX
UK

Re: Eileen Dover university application

Dear Eileen,

Thank you for your recent application to join us at the University of Awesome’s science faculty to study as part of your PhD next year. I will answer your questions one by one, in the following sections.

Starting dates

We are happy to accomodate you starting your study with us at any time, however it would suit us better if you could start at the beginning of a semester; the start dates for each one are as follows:

  • First semester: 9 September 2016
  • Second semester: 15 January 2017
  • Third semester: 2 May 2017

Please let me know if this is ok, and if so which start date you would prefer.

You can find more information about important university dates on our website.

Subjects of study

At the Awesome Science Faculty, we have a pretty open-minded research facility — as long as the subjects fall somewhere in the realm of science and technology. You seem like an intelligent, dedicated researcher, and just the kind of person we'd like to have on our team. Saying that, of the ideas you submitted we were most intrigued by are as follows, in order of priority:

  1. Turning H2O into wine, and the health benefits of Resveratrol (C14H12O3.)
  2. Measuring the effect on performance of funk bassplayers at tempratures exceeding 30° C (86° F), when the audience size exponentially increases (effect of 3 × 103 > 3 × 104.)
  3. HTML and CSS constructs for representing musical scores.

So please can you provide more information on each of these subjects, including how long you'd expect the research to take, required staff and other resources, and anything else you think we'd need to know?
Thanks.

Exotic dance moves

Yes, you are right!
As part of my post-doctorate work, I did study exotic tribal dances.
To answer your question, my favourite dances are as follows, with definitions:

Polynesian chicken dance
A little known but very influential dance dating back as far as 300BC, a whole village would dance around in a circle like chickens, to encourage their livestock or be "fruitful".
Icelandic brownian shuffle
Before the Icelanders developed fire as a means of getting warm, they used to practice this dance, which involved huddling close together in a circle on the floor, and shuffling their bodies around in imperceptably tiny, very rapid movements. One of my fellow students used to say that he thought this dance inspired modern styles such as Twerking.
Arctic robot dance
An interesting example of historic misinformation, English explorers in the 1960s believed to have discovered a new dance style characterised by "robotic", stilted movements, being practiced by inhabitants of Northern Alaska and Canada. Later on however it was discovered that they were just moving like this because they were really cold.

For more of my research, see my exotic dance research page.

Yours sincerely,
Dr Eleanor Gaye

University of Awesome motto: Be awesome to each other -- Bill S Preston, Esq.


(Chris Mills) #17

This doesn’t look too bad to me. I’ve noticed a couple of bits immediately:

  1. The top address and date need to be over on the right hand side. To achieve this, you need to give the wrapping paragraphs class=“receiver-column”

  2. You are missing some <sup> elements in the bit “effect of 3 × 103 > 3 × 104”

You can check your markup in more detail against our finished version:

https://mdn.github.io/learning-area/html/introduction-to-html/marking-up-a-letter-finished/

Also see the marking guide at


(Blk Mgn Bdt) #18

Hello, I just finished the letter assessment.

I would like for one of you fantastic individuals to correct me on my errors.

Appreciate it!

<html lang="en">

<head>
	<meta charset="utf-8">
	<title>Letter</title>
	<link rel="stylesheet" href="letter.css">
</head>

<body>
	<header>
		<div class="receiver-column">
			<p><em><strong>Dr. Eleanor Gaye</strong> <br />
				<p> Awesome Science faculty </p>
				<p> University of Awesome  </p>
				<p> Bobtown, CA 99999, </p>
				<p> USA </p> 
				<p> <strong>Tel</strong>: 123-456-7890</p>
				<p> <strong>Email</strong>: no_reply@example.com </em> 20 January 2016</p>
			</div>
			<p>Miss Eileen Dover</p>
			<p>4321 Cliff Top Edge</p>
			<p>Dover, CT9 XXX</p>
			<p>UK</p>
		</p>
		<header>
			<h1>Re: Eileen Dover university application</h1>
			<section>
				<p>Dear Eileen, Thank you for your recent application to join us at the University of Awesome's science faculty to study as part of your PhD next year. I will answer your questions one by one, in the following sections. Starting dates We are happy to accomodate you starting your study with us at any time, however it would suit us better if you could start at the beginning of a semester; the start dates for each one are as follows:</p>
				<ul>
					<li>First semester: 9 September 2016</li>
					<li>Second semester: 15 January 2017</li>
					<li>Third semester: 2 May 2017</li>
				</ul>
				<p>Please let me know if this is ok, and if so which start date you would prefer. You can find more information about important university dates on our website.</p>
				<article>
					<h2>Subjects of study</h2> At the Awesome Science Faculty, we have a pretty open-minded research facility — as long as the subjects fall somewhere in the realm of science and technology. You seem like an intelligent, dedicated researcher, and just the kind of person we'd like to have on our team. Saying that, of the ideas you submitted we were most intrigued by are as follows, in order of priority:
					<ol>
						<li>Turning H<sub>2</sub>O into wine, and the health benefits of Resveratrol (C<sub>14</sub>H<sub>12</sub>O<sub>3</sub>.)</li>
						<li>Measuring the effect on performance of funk bassplayers at tempratures exceeding 30<sup>o</sup>C (86<sup>o</sup>F), when the audience size exponentially increases (effect of 3 x 10<sup>3</sup> > 3 x 10<sup>4</sup>.)</li>
						<li>
							<abbr title="Hyper Text MarkUp Language">HTML</abbr> and
							<abbr title="Cascading Style Sheets">CSS</abbr> constructs for representing musical scores.</li>
						</ol>
						So please can you provide more information on each of these subjects, including how long you'd expect the research to take, required staff and other resources, and anything else you think we'd need to know? Thanks.
					</article>
					<article>
						<h2>Exotic dance moves</h2> Yes, you are right! As part of my post-doctorate work, I <i>did</i> study exotic tribal dances. To answer your question, my favourite dances are as follows, with definitions:
						<dl>
							<dt>Polynesian chicken dance</dt>
							<dd>A little known but <i>very</i> influential dance dating back as far as 300
								<abbr title="Before Christ">BC</abbr>, a whole village would dance around in a circle like chickens, to encourage their livestock or be "fruitful".</dd>
								<dt>Icelandic brownian shuffle</dt>
								<dd>Before the Icelanders developed fire as a means of getting warm, they used to practice this dance, which involved huddling close together in a circle on the floor, and shuffling their bodies around in imperceptably tiny, very rapid movements. One of my fellow students used to say that he thought this dance inspired modern styles such as Twerking.</dd>
								<dt>Arctic robot dance</dt>
								<dd>An interesting example of historic misinformation, English explorers in the 1960s believed to have discovered a new dance style characterised by "robotic", stilted movements, being practiced by inhabitants of Northern Alaska and Canada. Later on however it was discovered that they were just moving like this because they were really cold.</dd>
							</dl>
							<p>For more of my research, see my <a href="#">exotic dance research page.</a></p>
						</article>
						
						<address> 
							<p>Yours sincerely,</p>

							<p>Dr Eleanor Gay</p>
						</address>
						
					</section>

					<footer>
						<p>University of Awesome motto: "Be awesome to each other." -- <i>Bill S Preston, Esq</i></p>
					</footer>
				</body>

			</html>

(Chris Mills) #19

Hello there!

From a cursory look, your markup structure looks pretty good. A few immediate thoughts:

  • You’ve got two <header> tags - the second one needs to be turned into a closing tag for the markup to work as expected.
  • It looks like you’ve got an extra closing </p> before the second <header> tag.
  • Looks like you’ve missed out the date/time.
  • The sentences on the same lines as the <h2> elements need to be inside their own paragraphs

You can see all you need to do to complete the assessment on our marking guide:

Probably easier though is to just check your markup against our finished version:

Don’t get worried if you structure is not identical to ours — there are multiple ways to do each task in web deveopment. We didn’t include <section> and <article> elements in our version, but you’ve used yours well, so that’s fine.

Best regards,

Chris


(Vivek Agrawal) #20

@chrismills
Here’s my HTML letter markup assessment project. Please, have a look: https://github.com/vkWeb/letter-markup/blob/master/index.html

Please, give your feedback. It’ll help me in improving my skills. Thanks for the time Chris. :slight_smile: